Kenneth Freed, Music Director

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    Date: Sunday, May 21, 2017
    Time: 2:00 pm
    Location: 170 Good Counsel Drive
    Charles-Marie Widor
    Toccata from Symphony No. 5 for Organ
    Franz Schubert
    Fantasia in F minor for piano four hands, D. 940
    Bohuslav Martinu
    Three Madrigals for Violin and Viola
    Johannes Brahms
    Piano Quartet in c minor, op 60

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    Premium tickets are SOLD OUT. General admission still available.

    Fans of the keyboard should buy their tickets early for our final concert of the season as it is likely to sell out! The program opens with Widor’s festive Toccata on the organ. The fifth movement of his Fifth Symphony, this is the French composer’s most famous piece. It is frequently performed at festive Christmas and wedding celebrations; you will likely recognize this popular work. Four hands on one piano? Absolutely! The Fantasia is one of Schubert’s most original works and was composed in the last year of his life. Martinu was a Czech composer who fled to the US during World War II. While in NY in 1947, he wrote the Three Madrigals for sibling virtuosos Lillian and Joseph Fuchs. The piece contains reminiscences of well-known works by Beethoven, Vivaldi, Franck, and Richard Strauss. Brahms’ monumental C minor Piano Quartet was begun when Brahms was quite young and vulnerable. He felt despair as illness took his friend and mentor Robert Schumann, and at the same time the pain of his unrequited love for Clara Schumann. The turmoil he felt with these conflicting emotions created an incredible musical work that he did not complete for twenty years. The piece takes advantage of the piano’s power and range, and skillfully contrasts the piano with the strings.

    Mary Jo Gothmann’s organ playing is a highlight every season – you won’t want to miss her! She is joined on this concert by Music on the Hill regulars Scott Lykins and Lydia Miller Choorapuzha and newcomer Deanna Anderson, whose sensitive playing will tug at your heart strings.

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